This eerie landscape—taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on July 11—shows uncanny detail of the mountains within Copernicus crater, which runs nearly 60 miles (97 kilometers) wide and features peaks thousands of feet high.
The “fascinating and geologically rich” Copernicus crater represents a potential gold mine of information about the moon’s surface, the website said.
The crater was a runner-up for the Apollo landing site, and has been suggested as a target for a robotic rover in a submission to NASA’s Discovery Program.

This eerie landscape—taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on July 11—shows uncanny detail of the mountains within Copernicus crater, which runs nearly 60 miles (97 kilometers) wide and features peaks thousands of feet high.

The “fascinating and geologically rich” Copernicus crater represents a potential gold mine of information about the moon’s surface, the website said.

The crater was a runner-up for the Apollo landing site, and has been suggested as a target for a robotic rover in a submission to NASA’s Discovery Program.

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