astronomyforamateurs:

One of Jupiter’s moons, Ganymede, is partially eclipsed by the gas giant in this Hubble telescope image. Ganymede completes an orbit around Jupiter once per week, though this particular image was useful in that it allowed astronomers to determine how hazy Jupiter’s atmosphere is by measuring light reflected off of Ganymede.Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Karkoschka (U. Arizona)For more astronomy, check out AstronomyForAmateurs.com

astronomyforamateurs:

One of Jupiter’s moons, Ganymede, is partially eclipsed by the gas giant in this Hubble telescope image. Ganymede completes an orbit around Jupiter once per week, though this particular image was useful in that it allowed astronomers to determine how hazy Jupiter’s atmosphere is by measuring light reflected off of Ganymede.

Credit: NASAESA, and E. Karkoschka (U. Arizona)

For more astronomy, check out AstronomyForAmateurs.com

humanoidhistory:

Interstellar gas and dust never looked so beautiful. Behold this detail of the n the Carina Nebula, 7500 light-years away in the southern constellation of Carina.
(European Space Agency)

humanoidhistory:

Interstellar gas and dust never looked so beautiful. Behold this detail of the n the Carina Nebula, 7500 light-years away in the southern constellation of Carina.

(European Space Agency)

tulipnight:

Rhododendron Laden Path by David Mosner

tulipnight:

Rhododendron Laden Path by David Mosner

airbuilder7:

Sol 613: New Curiosity selfie, direct from the surface of Mars. 
Humongous resolution:
 http://dougellison.smugmug.com/Landscapes/Curiosity/i-h8tgjCn/0/O/sol_613_MAHLI_selfie.jpg
The picture is a stitched composite of multiple photographs taken by the MAHLI instrument on the end of Curiosity’s main arm. The multiple, overlapping photographs allow the arm to “disappear.” 
Trippy version of that composite: 
https://twitter.com/elakdawalla/status/460924905916096512/photo/1/large
Video of how they do it: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/?id=1171#fragment-1

airbuilder7:

Sol 613: New Curiosity selfie, direct from the surface of Mars. 

Humongous resolution:

 http://dougellison.smugmug.com/Landscapes/Curiosity/i-h8tgjCn/0/O/sol_613_MAHLI_selfie.jpg

The picture is a stitched composite of multiple photographs taken by the MAHLI instrument on the end of Curiosity’s main arm. The multiple, overlapping photographs allow the arm to “disappear.” 

Trippy version of that composite: 

https://twitter.com/elakdawalla/status/460924905916096512/photo/1/large

Video of how they do it: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/?id=1171#fragment-1

infinite donut

infinite donut